About

Felix Beinlich ProfilbildI am a cell biologist and biophysicist born and raised up in Münster, Germany. After my high-school diploma I have studied cell biology and biophysics at the University of Osnabrück. During my time in Osnabrück I have worked as a student assistant in the group of Experimental Ecology heady by Prof. Dr. Till Eggers. Here we have investigated  the „personality“ variation in clonal insects and its dependence of their life-history (Schuett et al., 2011; 2014). For my bachelor thesis I was working in the  group of Mitochondrial Dynamics headed by Prof. Dr. Karin Busch where I was investigating the subcellular localization of the Parkinson’s Disease related protein PINK-1 in cultured cells with superresolution microscopy. After I have awarded my Bachelors Degree and during my Master studies I continued in this group as a research assistant and focused my education more towards the related field of biophysics. I successfully graduated in 2014 with the detailed investigation of the mitochondrial localization of PINK-1 depending on the membrane-polarization of mitochondria with triple-color localization microscopy in living cells (Beinlich et al., 2015).

After my graduation I made an internship at the  University of Michigan in the Bardwell Lab, an Howard Hughes Medical Institut. At the UofM we have studied the characteristics of different yeast chaperone candidates on protein aggregation and fibril formation. Furthermore we have worked on the clarification of the crystal structure of these putative chaperones.

Currently, I am working as a doctoral researcher at the Institute of Complex Systems (Cellular Biophysics) headed by Prof. Christoph Fahlke at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. Here I am looking for optimal fluorescent biosensors to determine intracellular ion concentrations e.g. in primary neuronal cells to investigate effects of specific ion channels and transporters.

Skills and Interests: 

  • Fluorescent Biosensors (pH, Chloride, Calcium) and their application in living cells with fluorescence light microscopy techniques (FLIM, TPSPC)
  • Protein-Protein Interaction studies (FLIM-FRET, BiFC)
  • Protein Aggregation studies
  • Fibril formation studies (Abeta
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Culture Techniques
  • Fluorescent Labelling of Molecules and cellular compartments for physiological sensing in living cells
  • Superresolution-Microscopy (FPALM, PALM, TALM, TIRFM, STORM)
  • X-Ray crystallization
  • Protein structure determination

Publications:

 

2016:

  • Horowitz S, Koepnick B, Martin R, Tymieniecki A, Winburn AA, Cooper S, Flatten J, Rogawski DS, Koropatkin NM, Hailu TT, Jain N, Koldewey P, Ahlstrom LS, Chapman MR, Sikkema AP, Skiba MA, Maloney FP, Beinlich FR; Foldit Players; University of Michigan students, Popović Z, Baker D, Khatib F, Bardwell JC. (2016) Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework. Nat. Commun., 7, 12549. – Fulltext

2015:

  • Beinlich FR, Drees C, Piehler J, and Busch KB (2015). Shuttling of PINK1 between mitochondrial microcompartments resolved by triple-color superresolution microscopy. ACS Chem. Biol., 10 (9), pp 1970–1976 – Fulltext
  • Schuett W, Dall S, Baeumer J, Kloesener MH, Nakagawa S, Beinlich F, and Eggers T. (2015). Life-history trade-offs mediate ‚personality‘ variation in two colour morphs of the pea aphid,  Acyrthosiphon pisumJ Anim Ecol,, 84, 90-101 – Fulltext

2014

  • Beinlich F. (2014).  Master Thesis. Group of Mitochondrial Dynamics. School of Biology/Chemistry. University of Osnabrück.

2012:

  • Beinlich F. (2012). Bachelor Thesis. Group of Mitochondrial Dynamics. School of Biology/Chemistry. University of Osnabrück.

2011:

  • Schuett W, Dall S, Baeumer J, Kloesener MH, Nakagawa S, Beinlich F, and Eggers T. (2011). “Personality” Variation in a Clonal Insect: The Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Dev.Psychobiol. 53, 631–640. – Fulltext

Additional Informations:

ORCID
ResearchGate Profile
XING Profile
Group of Mitochondrial Dynamics, School of Biology, University of Osnabrueck
Bardwell Lab, University of Michigan
Forschungszentrum Jülich – Institute of Complex Systems 4